Ratings Shopping Haunts Commercial Mortgage Bonds as Risks Rise

The retail slaughter caused by on-line shopping (Amazon effect) and sluggish wage growth since The Great Recession are taking a toll on large shopping mall stores and, as a consequence, commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS).

(Bloomberg) – Matt Scully and Adam Tempkin – Only a decade ago, global investors got a hard lesson about the dangers of relying on rosy bond ratings. Now they’re getting a reminder — this time in frothy corners of the $528 billion U.S. commercial-mortgage bondmarket.

As delinquencies on loans rise, some ratings firms are walking back their grades on bonds tied to properties like shopping malls and office towers, just a few years after assigning them. DBRS Inc. last month lowered the AAA ratings it had given 294 interest-only bonds after realizing it had been too lenient. Also in March, Kroll Bond Rating Agency Inc. cut some of its grades on a $1 billion bond issued in 2014, citing weakness in Texas loans exposed to energy prices.

The reversals underscore how forces that brought trouble to financial markets before are still percolating through Wall Street today. No one sees the dangers as being nearly as grave as they were during the home mortgage bust. But the same ratings business model used during that period still prevails — meaning that the banks that put together debt securities still pay for the credit grades, and they can shop around for the firm that will give them the highest ratings under the loosest criteria.

According to Trepp, retail delinquencies have risen to 6.12% as of March 17, 2016 (following only industrial loans).

And a foreclosure appeared in the WBCMT 2007-C32 CMBS deal (Rockvale Square in Lancaster, PA). Not to mention a non-performing property in teh BSCMS 2007-PW15 deal.

The WBCMT 2007-C32, a Wachovia deal, is now rated at CCC+ or lower for tranches B through D. Tranches E and F are rated as D by S&P. The H tranche, rated as C by Moody’s, has eaten $15.5 million in losses thus far. Tranches J and K are gone after sustaining losses of $56.6 million and $33,46 million, respectively. At least tranches A1, A2 and APB paid off with no losses.

And with delinquencies rising over the last year, the retail forecast is gloomy.

Parks and Recreation’s Tom Haverford may have to change his tune on “things are forever.” Particularly if shopping at Macy’s , Sears, JC Penney’s, The Limited, Abercrombie and Fitch, etc. 

Yes, Tom, you can buy things on-line. Unless your wages are slow to grow and you have accumulated significant debt. Particularly during the worst wage recovery after recession in modern history.

 

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